Walk Like a Geocacher

January 3, 2011

What is Geocaching?

Geocaching (pronounced geo-cashing) is a worldwide game of hiding and seeking treasure. A geocacher can place a geocache in the world, pinpoint its location using GPS technology and then share the geocache’s existence and location online. Anyone with a GPS device can then try to locate the geocache.

This clip from the movie Splinterheads is the best explanation I’ve seen so far:

For Those Already in the Geo-Know…

This would be PERFECT for the geocaching theme song! I totally cracked when I saw the  geocacher’s reaction to the “muggles” part (been there done that)! These folks did an OUTSTANDING job on this vid…

or you can look at it as playing pirates with treasure maps like you did when you were a kid. just now it is electronic based. and it’s not just kids playing.

Yes, I work from home!

October 20, 2010

I’ve been working from home for a few years now.  Virtual call centers are popping up all over, and many are Fortune 500 companies!

I work for National Electronics Warranty (N.E.W), recently  named one of the “Best Places to Work” for 2010 by Washington Business Journal.

NEW is hiring Home-Based Customer Care Representatives (CCRs) to take inbound customer service and support calls. As a Home-Based CCR, you help customers from the comforts of your home—answering their questions, troubleshooting problems with their product and arranging service or replacement as needed. It’s a fulfilling job that gives you a variety of schedules, hourly pay and the opportunity to work from home.

Here are a few more Fortune 500 top ranked work at home companies!

Alpine Access

Alpine Access was established in 1998. They’re approach to customer service is to bring the call center to the employee verses bringing the employee to the office. With Alpine Access, you are an employee not an independent contractor.Applicants undergo an extensive application process to ensure that Alpine Access is hiring the best customer service reps. All interviews are done online. Also there is no fees but, once an applicant is offered the position they are required to pay $45 for a background check.

Arise

Arise Virtual Solutions, Inc.,originally Willow CSN Incorporated, was founded in 1997. Arise specializes in home-based sales, customer service and technical support.They service over 40 companies world wide by providing well rained, profession, telephone representatives. According to their website, You choose when and how often you provide service with flexible scheduling options that allow you to divide your time into increments as few as 30 minutes.With Arise, and a worker is an independent consultant and not an employee.

Cloud 10

Cloud 10 was established in 2006. With Cloud 10 a worker is an employee. They allow employees to set there own schedule to allow flexibility. All interviews are done online. The application process is very simple. Cloud 10 specializes in Inbound Communications, Outbound Communications, Back Office Administration, CRM Consultancy Services, Contact Automation, In-Language Support, and Business Continuity.

LiveOps

LiveOps was established in 2000. With LiveOps workers are independent consultants. There are no contractors fees but you will need to pay $30.00 for a background check. LiveOps specialize in Customer Service, Call Center Outsourcers, IT/Operations, Direct Response, and Sales & Marketing. LiveOps has over 200 customers ranging from small businesses to Fortune 500 companies.

West

West is a Fortune 10000 company. With west you can work in office or at home. There are no fees to be paid ever. West At Home offers schedules based on either per minute rate, per call OR guaranteed hourly rate. With West At Home workers are independent contractors.

Working Solutions

Established in 1996, Working Solutions has been providing excellent customer service reps. With Working solutions workers are independent consultants. There are no fees to be paid ever.

**
There are tons of other legitimate companies out there you just need to know where to look.There are even some well known companies that you may have never thought you could work for at home some of these include:

* Delta Airlines
* JetBlue
* Uhaul
* 1800flowers

When looking at these work at home jobs remember to look at the technology specifications. Many of these companies will have requirements such as equipment and computer capabilities. Do not fear,with these companies the most you will need is a dedicated phone line, a head set, a working computer, a printer and a fax. But again view the sites carefully to ensure your hardware is up to par.


CECT SciPhone i9+ set up for AT&T WAP and MMS

April 9, 2010

At&t WAP Setup

***First Step***
1.Main menu –> Select Services
2.Select Data Account –> Select GPRS
3.Select the first entry
4.Edit the account name to whatever you would like
5.Edit APN to wap.cingular (lowercase)
6.Edit Username to WAP@CINGULARGPRS.COM (UPPERCASE)
7.Edit Password to CINGULAR1 (UPPERCASE)
8.Edit Auth Type. to Secure
9. Save
Select Back –> Select Back

***Second Step***
Select WAP
1.Select Settings –> Edit Profile
2.Select the first entry –> Edit Profile
3.Edit the name to whatever you would like
4.Edit Homepage to http://device.home
5.Edit Data Account to the Name you established in the First Step
6.Edit Connection type to HTTP
7.The IP address is 066.209.011.032 and the port number is 8080
8.Edit Username to WAP@CINGULARGPRS.COM
9.Edit Password to CINGULAR1
Select back or done
Select Activate Account

You should now see a Black [G] in the upper left of your screen.
To access the net select Services –> WAP –> Homepage.
If it connects the Black [G] should turn Green

MMS
Select Messages –> MMS –> Message Settings
Select Server Profile
Select the first entry
Select Edit Profile
Edit Rename Profile to whatever name you would like
Edit Home Page to http://mmsc.cingular.com
Edit Data Account to the same data account you created for WAP
Edit Connection Type to HTTP the IP address is 066.209.011.032 and the port is 8080
Edit the Username to WAP@CINGULARGPRS.COM (UPPERCASE)
Edit the Password to CINGULAR1 (UPPERCASE)
Select Done or Save
Make sure to activate the profile and you are good.

At&t WAP Setup

***First Step***
1.Main menu –> Select Services
2.Select Data Account –> Select GPRS
3.Select the first entry
4.Edit the account name to whatever you would like
5.Edit APN to wap.cingular (lowercase)
6.Edit Username to WAP@CINGULARGPRS.COM (UPPERCASE)
7.Edit Password to CINGULAR1 (UPPERCASE)
8.Edit Auth Type. to Secure
9. Save
Select Back –> Select Back

***Second Step***
Select WAP
1.Select Settings –> Edit Profile
2.Select the first entry –> Edit Profile
3.Edit the name to whatever you would like
4.Edit Homepage to http://device.home
5.Edit Data Account to the Name you established in the First Step
6.Edit Connection type to HTTP
7.The IP address is 066.209.011.032 and the port number is 8080
8.Edit Username to WAP@CINGULARGPRS.COM
9.Edit Password to CINGULAR1
Select back or done
Select Activate Account

You should now see a Black [G] in the upper left of your screen.
To access the net select Services –> WAP –> Homepage.
If it connects the Black [G] should turn Green

MMS
Select Messages –> MMS –> Message Settings
Select Server Profile
Select the first entry
Select Edit Profile
Edit Rename Profile to whatever name you would like
Edit Home Page to http://mmsc.cingular.com
Edit Data Account to the same data account you created for WAP
Edit Connection Type to HTTP the IP address is 066.209.011.032 and the port is 8080
Edit the Username to WAP@CINGULARGPRS.COM (UPPERCASE)
Edit the Password to CINGULAR1 (UPPERCASE)
Select Done or Save
Make sure to activate the profile and you are good.


CECT SciPhone i9+ Internet Setup and Config Tutorial

April 9, 2010

This tutorial will tell you how to Setup Internet for the CECT i9+ iPhone Clone fot AT&T and T-Mobile Networks.

So here is how to config the Internet Connection for the CECT i9+

cect iphone i9 3g internet Services

Step (1) Create Account Data

Internet Settings for Cingular AT&T:

  1. Select [Services]
  2. Select [Data Account]
  3. Select [GPRS]
  4. Select the first entry
  5. Account Name enter: (ATT) (or whatever you would like)
  6. Press Options
  7. Press Done or OK
  8. Edit APN to wap.cingular (lowercase)
  9. Press Options
  10. Press Done or OK
  11. Edit Username to: WAP@CINGULARGPRS.COM (UPPERCASE)
  12. Press Options
  13. Press Done or OK
  14. Edit Password to CINGULAR1 (UPPERCASE)
  15. Press Options
  16. Press Done or OK
  17. Edit Auth Type: to Secure
  18. Press Done
  19. Press Save

Internet Settings for T-Mobile:

  1. Select [Services]
  2. Select [Data Account]
  3. Select [GPRS]
  4. Select the first entry
  5. Account Name enter: (Tmobile) (or whatever you would like)
  6. Press Options
  7. Press Done or OK
  8. Edit APN to wap.voicestream.com (lowercase)
  9. Press Options
  10. Press Done or OK
  11. Edit Username to: (leave blank)
  12. Press Options
  13. Press Done or OK
  14. Edit Password to: (leave blank)
  15. Press Options
  16. Press Done or OK
  17. Edit Auth Type: to Secure
  18. Press Done
  19. Press Save

HINT: After Creating Account Data Click on [BACK] Twice, it will take you back to SERVICES.

Step (2) Create Profile

  1. Select Services
  2. Select WAP
  3. Select Setting
  4. Select Edit Profile
  5. Select the first entry (China Mobile)
  6. Choose Edit Profile
  7. Rename Profile enter: (ATT WAP or the Tmobile) (or whatever you would like)
  8. Press Options
  9. Press Done or OK
  10. Edit Homepage to http://www.google.com/ncr (or whatever you like)
  11. Press Options
  12. Press Done or OK
  13. Data Account select GPRS
  14. Select (ATT WAP) the Name you established in the First Step and press OK
  15. Edit Connection type to HTTP
  16. The Proxy address is 066.209.011.032 (for AT&T)
    and 216.155.175.105 (for T-mobile and Port number is 8080 and press OK
  17. Edit Username to: WAP@CINGULARGPRS.COM (for AT&T) or leave blank for T-mobile
  18. Press Options
  19. Press Done or OK
  20. Edit Password to CINGULAR1 or leave blank for T-mobile
  21. Press Options
  22. Press Done or OK
  23. Press Done
  24. When prompted to SAVE select [Yes]
  25. Select Activate Profile
  26. When prompted to Activate Profile choose [Yes]

To Access the Internet

  1. Select [Services]
  2. Select [WAP]
  3. Select [Homepage]

You will see (G) in blue.


Who REALLY killed the ‘puter?

August 24, 2009

Computer Hell

Some times troubleshooting a computer (motherboard)  is just a bitch.

Usually I have all the patience in the world when it comes to repairing pc’s and dealing with their owners. Not this weekend though.   No, this one was starting to damage my calm.    Before painting circles on the shiny HP case  (for target practice of course), I discussed the issue with my  cohorts over at Tech Republic, and with so may great tips put down in one place, I figured I might as well share.

Here is a loose transcription for:

The HP MOBO… how can you be SURE it’s really the problem?

Not certain if it is the mobo, psu, or video card. I’m working on a HP a6303w with an Asus IPIBL-LB mobo (with no led indicator) and a 300 watt psu. Sometimes within 10 seconds of start up, it will shut itself down momentarily then power back up and stay on.  I get NO beeps, even with EVERYTHING disconnected. The fans come on, and all devices have power, but nothing responds. The monitor will say no signal and go to sleep and won’t wake up. the keyboard may or may not flash but never powers on up. The dvd drive will open and close but never sounds like it’s spinning/reading.

I have swapped memory, cleared cmos, replaced the battery, and reset the psu. I tried contacting both HP and ASUS, but frankly, they were useless.

1. Not much you can do here other

OH Smeg – 08/20/09 Than replace the PS. These things use at least 3 different Voltage Rails and if one is down while the unit may seem to work it’s not either getting enough or any power to at least one of those circuits.

By the sounds of your description it sounds as if either the 5 V DC or 1.3 V DC rails are either not producing any Voltage or are way down on current. Replacing the PS may get it working again but it is just as likely that the Faulty PS has taken the M’Board along for the ride and if this has a AMD CPU I would expect that as well to be no longer working.

It’s just that the AMD Chip Sets don’t seem to isolate the CPU’s as well as Intel Chip Sets do from nasty things happening.

Col

1.1. 3 strikes, and I’m still out…

twilazoned – 08/21/09 Thanks for the fast response!

I had just returned to find your response after replacing the ps with two diff ones, but each had the same result. When I press the power button, everything comes on strong, lasts a few seconds, powers down like it’s dead for about 3 seconds, then boots back up and stays running. Still, none of the devices actually WORK, they just have power.

I did notice that the heat sink was totally gunked up. I cleaned it, the cpu (Intel, btw), and reapplied some fresh thermal grease. Wondering if it got overheated after seeing how thick as the gunk was.

Also noticed that the hdd led doesn’t flicker at all after the second power up. It just stays solid.

I just want to make sure it IS the mobo before I shell out that kind of money.

1.1.1. I was going to say, clean the processor, but you beat me to it..

Peconet Tietokoneet – 08/21/09 The first port of call to me would be the processor, but you have cleaned that. By the way did you apply a very,very small amount of thermal paste to the processor? With that done the second would be the power supply unit.
Another thing you can try out.. IS the computer in question Overclocked? Have a look in the BIOS and then select “Default settings”, then “save and exit”.
If that does not work then a new motherboard will be the next choice.

1.1.1.1. Overclocked??

twilazoned – 08/21/09 Oh yes, I reapplied the grease, but unless there is a way to find out without reading a monitor, I have no idea if it’s overclocked. When it starts up, the monitor says no signal, going to sleep. (and yes, i put in a new video card to tbs)

1.1.1.1.1. Depending on the M’Board here

OH Smeg – 08/21/09You can look at the Jumpers on it or Clear the BIOS to remove any Overclocking that may have been present. Though if the M’Board CPU has suffered because of Overclocking it will not undo any of the damage.

Col

1.1.2. A thought….

—TK— – 08/21/09 I would look all over the Mobo for a blown compositor… If you find a “popped cap” that could and would cause this issue. They are the little cylinder looking things with a “x” on top. They should be level, not bumped up, or worse case leaking acid.

you can google “Popped cap” (Images) and find what they can look like if you have never seen it before.

Added: I should have read Jacky Howe’s post before posting…

1.1.2.1. Popped caps?

twilazoned – 08/21/09 Had never heard that term before! Actually, I did go back and take a detailed look at them after you and Jack’s suggestion, however, they all look fine.

1.1.3. MOBO problems

dpalsen – 08/21/09 Easiest way to tell if it’s the PSU is to look at the BIOS and check if your CPU is overheated, as in most modern BIOSes, it will tell you. If it isn’t POSTing, are there any beep codes, or is there any way to look at the MOBO and find a troubleshooting light or some such.

As for it powering back on with the HDD LED not coming on, try unplugging all of the drives, and see if it will at least make it past POST. The other thought is to try a video card, but I’m REALLY skeptical that that would be the problem. I’m really leaning motherboard on this one.

1.1.3.1. No bells or whistles…

twilazoned – 08/21/09 I am almost traumatized by this HP. I finally realized that I wasn’t hearing any post codes because there was no on board speaker installed on her pc! Add to that NO led on the mobo, and the realization that it was put out with a cheesy 250 w ps, and I find I have never been so disappointed in an HP product.

Asus doesn’t even have support for the mb (because it’s OEM) and the 1st Asus sepport guy stopped me cold and said “oh I can’t tell you a thing about it. I don’t have any manuals, specs, information, nothing”.  I said, “but you made it” and he says “yeah but really, HP just called and said hey we need you to make us some mobo’s, and we just cranked them up and shipped them out”.  So don’t expect any kind of support from Asus if it’s an OEM board.  The second 2nd Asus support guy (who was really cool btw) helped me out anyhow and said the only things left would be that’s it’s either grounding out or fried.

About to pull that puppy out and see if it’ll bark on a sheet of cardboard…

1.1.3.1.1. New motherboard

bwilmot@… – 08/22/09 If it is one of the older AMD sockets (939) you may find a decent price at ascendtech.

I just replaced one this last weekend (HP AMBERINEM-GL6E S.939 2000FSB MBOARD, 5188-2526) 75.99 If it is the same style, be aware that the MB next to it (same page, bottom left and right) is the same but with composite out. (if not still a good source for other boards).

http://www.ascendtech.us/index.asp?FSCat=302&url=IND&iFromFeatured=1

Edited to add; You can find cheaper 939 boards, but this saved me hours by not needing to do a repair, updates, ect.

2. Also

Jacky Howe – 08/21/09 Check the Capacitors around the CPU for swelling or bulging. They should have a flat head with a cross indent.

2.1. If the Capacitors are OK

Jacky Howe – 08/21/09 and it’s starting and running I wouldn’t suspect the CPU. They normally work or they don’t.

Carefully remove everything from the Motherboard. Remove the Motherboard and put it on an anti-static mat on a bench. Remove the Power Supply if it is a known working good one to test with. Remove the Heatsink and give it a good clean. Remove the CPU and reseat it. Reinstall the Heatsink remembering to use CPU grease. Clean the golden edge of each memory stick and the video card with a soft rubber/eraser, remembering not to touch the golden edge. Reseat the RAM and test with one stick at a time. Connect the Video Card. Connect the Power supply to the Motherboard. You can use a flat blade Screwdriver to short the Power pins on the Motherboard if you haven’t got a spare switch. Connect the Monitor and turn it on and see what happens. If it stars up add one Device at a time to test it. If it doesn’t then the Motherboard has failed.


How Cool Are YOUR Sneakers????

June 23, 2009

GUIDE TO LACING

One area of sneakerology we’ve somehow managed to avoid is the vital area of laces. Recently however, I found Professor Shoelace and was humbled by his academic knowledge of this black art. The p-rof has created, without doubt, the best shoelace website in the universe Ian’s Shoelace Site.  Here, he laments his latent love of laces and introduces fifteen of his personal favourite ways of rigging rides, including helpful diagrams. Then we learn how to modify your aglets to the correct length and tie his very own ‘ian’ knot, the world’s fastest way of shackling sneaks. Just don’t mention velcro or boondoggles! (not.)

1. The lace is run straight across the bottom and emerges through both bottom eyelets 2. The laces then go straight up and are fed into the next set of eyelets up the shoe 3. The ends are crossed over and are fed under the vertical lace section on the opposite sides of the shoe before going straight up and into the next set of eyelets up the shoe 4. At the top set of eyelets, the laces can once again cross over and pass under the straight section as shown. This not only looks consistent with the rest of the lacing but also forms a High Lace Lock, which tightens the lacing even more firmly.


1. The lace is run straight across the bottom and emerges through both bottom eyelets 2. The ends are looped back under the lace where it feeds under the side of the shoe 3. The ends are then crossed over each other, then they go under and out through the next set of eyelets up the shoe 4. Steps 2 and 3 are repeated until both ends reach the top eyelets.


1. The lace runs straight across the second set of eyelets from the top of the shoe 2. Cross the ends over and feed into the fourth set of eyelets, skipping the third set 3. Continue down the shoe, two sets of eyelets at a time 4. At the bottom, run the laces vertically between the bottom and second from bottom eyelets 5. Double back and work your way back up the shoe through the vacant sets of eyelets.


1. The lace is run straight across the bottom and emerges through both bottom eyelets 2. The left (red) end is spiralled up the left side of the shoe, with the end fed under and emerging from each eyelet 3. The right (orange) lace is spiralled up the right side of the shoe, at each eyelet looping through the left (blue) lace in the middle of the shoe before feeding under and emerging from the next eyelet.


1. The lace is run straight across the bottom and emerges through both bottom eyelets 2. One end of the lace (orange end) runs straight up the right side, is fed into and runs straight across the second set of eyelets 3. Both ends now run straight up the left side, each skipping one eyelet before feeding in two eyelets higher up 4. Continue running both ends across the shoe, then straight up two eyelets at a time 5. At the top of the shoe, the laces end up on the same side and the shoelace knot is tied at that point.


1. The lace runs straight across the bottom and the ends are fed into both bottom eyelets 2. One end of the lace (orange end) runs straight up the right side, emerges from and runs straight across the second set of eyelets 3. The other end (red end) runs diagonally underneath and, skipping the 2nd set of eyelets, emerges from and runs straight across the 3rd set of eyelets 4. Continue running each lace diagonally across and up 2 sets of eyelets until one end (orange in my example) reaches the top right eyelet 5. The other end (red in my example) then runs straight up the left side to emerge from the top left eyelet.


1. The lace runs straight across and emerges from the third set of eyelets from the bottom 2. Both ends run straight down and are fed into the second set of eyelets from the bottom 3. Both ends again run straight down and emerge from the bottom set of eyelets 4. Both ends now run straight up along the outside and are fed into the fourth set of eyelets (the first vacant pair) 5. The ends are crossed over each other, then they go under and out through the next set of eyelets up the shoe 6. Repeat step (5) until both ends reach the top.


1. The lace is run straight across the bottom and is fed into rather than emerging from both bottom eyelets 2. The ends are crossed over, then inserted into the next set of eyelets up the shoe 3. This process is repeated until both ends reach the top eyelets and end up inside.


1. The lace runs straight across the bottom and emerges through both bottom eyelets 2. Skipping two sets of eyelets, cross the ends over and feed into the fourth set of eyelets 3. Both ends now run straight down one eyelet and emerge from the third set of eyelets 4. Continue up the shoe, each time crossing over and going up three sets of eyelets, then straight down to emerge from the next set of eyelets below.


1. The lace is run straight across the bottom and emerges through both bottom eyelets 2. The ends are twisted together with one complete twist in the middle of the shoe 3. The ends then continue across to the opposite sides, where they go under and out through the next set of eyelets up the shoe 4. This process is repeated until both ends reach the top eyelets.


1. The lace runs straight across the bottom and emerges from both bottom eyelets 2. Cross the ends over and feed into the 4th set of eyelets up the shoe (skip past 2 sets of eyelets) 3. Both ends now run straight up and emerge from the 5th set of eyelets 4. Cross the ends over and feed into the 2nd set of eyelets up the shoe (skip past 2 sets of eyelets) 5. Both ends now run straight up and emerge from the 3rd set of eyelets 6. Cross the ends over, feed under and emerge from the top set of eyelets (skip past 2 sets of eyelets).


1. The lace is run diagonally and emerges from the bottom left and the top right eyelets 2. The top (red) end of the lace is zig-zagged from the top set of eyelets down to the middle eyelets in a similar manner to the Shoe Shop Lacing 3. The bottom (orange) end of the lace is similarly zig-zagged from the bottom set of eyelets up to the middle eyelets.


1. Start with two pairs of different colour laces, preferably the wide, flat variety (I was lucky to receive two such pairs with my last runners!) 2. With one colour (orange in my example), lace the shoe using either Straight (Fashion) or Straight (Lazy) Lacing 3. With the other colour (red in my example), Start at the bottom of the shoe and weave the lace in and out of the other lace until you reach the top 4. Fold around the top lace and head back down, weaving out and in until you reach the bottom 5. Continue across the shoe until you’re out of room or out of lace, whichever comes first 6. Tuck all the loose ends of the laces into the shoe.


1. The lace runs straight across the bottom and emerges from both bottom eyelets 2. Cross the ends over and feed into the 4th set of eyelets up the shoe (skip past 2 sets of eyelets) 3. Both ends now run straight up and emerge from the 5th set of eyelets 4. Cross the ends over and feed into the 2nd set of eyelets up the shoe (skip past 2 sets of eyelets) 5. Both ends now run straight up and emerge from the 3rd set of eyelets 6. Cross the ends over, feed under and emerge from the top set of eyelets (skip past 2 sets of eyelets).


1. Take two different colour laces, each a tiny bit longer than the correct length for the shoes 2. Cut them not quite in half, but offset by two or three centimetres. See below for how to calculate the difference in length between the two halves 3. Tie one shorter piece of one colour (orange in my example) and one longer piece of the other colour (red in my example) firmly together and trim off the excess. For extra security, add a dab of glue. Use the remaining pieces to make the bi-colour lace for the other shoe 4. Pull the longer (red) end out through the bottom right eyelet, feeding from inside the shoe, until you reach the joining knot 5. Now lace the rest of the shoe as per Straight (Fashion) Lacing.

For shoes with lugs instead of eyelets, see the Lug Lacing Methods

To read the full story from Professor Shoelace, click here


Did you know? 3.0….

February 22, 2009

3.0 for 2008 – Newly Revised Edition Created by Karl Fisch, and modified by Scott McLeod; Globalization & The Information Age. It was even adapted by Sony BMG at an executive meeting they held in Rome this year. Credits are also given to Scott McLeod, Jeff Brenman

http://www.btang.net/


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